Body Combat




I’m currently trying to explain to one of my best friends in Colorado where the hell I was last  night. Usually I code and set up all my blog posts at night (so I can kinda of you know, work my full-time job during the day) but I couldn’t move last night so I spent the latter part of my evening partially paralyzed and groaning on the couch. So here I am, improvising my morning post and trying to explain to you as poorly as I am to him where the hell I was last night.

I’m starting to feel like the Anthony Bourdain of workout classes. A lot of cynicism mixed with sarcasm and a hint of dangerous curiosity to try anything once. My friend Aurora is a Body Combat afficionado. She’s got the routines memorized, and can name the releases and individual moves without blinking. She’s even got the glove wraps, which she can put on while holding an in-depth conversation. She’s committed, coordinated and has energy to work out almost every day of the week. I’m filled with awe and envy.

Every week she invites me to Body Combat and this week I finally said “sure why not.” I mean, I’m in better shape now than a year ago, I’m getting a nice set of muscles and tone, and I can run nearly two miles. I can handle some basic choreographed mixed martial arts.

Oh my God, no I can’t.

The above video is as close to what I experienced as I could find. Loud, with lots of quick movement and on-your-feet learning and within seconds I knew I was way out of my league. I can’t dance. I can’t move to rhythm or follow the quick movements of others in sync; which is fine at weddings because I’m the kooky ginger kid you can have a good time with. But this? I looked sad. Very sad. And I know what you’re thinking, “it’s not about how you look, it’s about the exercise,” and that’s completely true, but man I don’t know If it’s something that’s totally me either. I’m a quiet exerciser. I love introspective. I love exercise that gives me the option of clearing my head or getting a lot of thinking done. That’s why yoga and pilates was an instant hit with me. I don’t mind routines or classes, but this felt like a drugless raid led by someone inhaling eight balls instead of oxygen. I was almost roundhouse kicked to the face several times, and while I know it was more me than them, there just wasn’t a lot of room for error. The movement is great. The cardio is great, and I feel great today, but I think I need more of a balanced alternative as far as environments go. This felt almost too enthusiastic, the same feeling I get when I’m around megachurch Christian scenesters, and it feels weird to say that.

So that brings me to this: Is there a form of exercise that you would turn down? What kind? Why? What do you prefer? I’d love to hear your feedback because, as I’m reasonably new to this I’m constantly looking for advice, conversation and ideas.

PS-Aurora, I’ll still go with you sometimes, no worries.



Comments

  1. She’s lying. She wasn’t the most uncoordinated person in the room. She actually rocked it and I saw the look of pure glee when she got a combo down.
    For more details on Body Combat try the Les Mills website here: http://bit.ly/d3DjHS
    I wasn’t always such a “aficionado” or “coordinated” I’ve slipped, I’ve fallen and I’ve kicked people and hurt myself. But I love it. The more you attend the easier it gets. I promise.
    Please come back on Tuesday!

  2. You kick people on purpose! :D

  3. I love love love pilates. However, I really do not like yoga at all. Maybe I haven’t done it correctly or enough but that is just too much introspection for me. I find pilates to be a perfect balance.

    That workout looks crazy fun though! I’d definitely try it once (and probably die).

  4. I didn’t appreciate yoga until I started running, and found it the perfect compliment. As you build your cardio threshhold, the ability to stretch and balance becomes almost as crucial, almost this mental feeling of…if I can run THIS far, I want to do something else just as good.

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